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Archive for July 18th, 2007

What follows is an excerpt from Jingozian’s extensive website.

Mike JingozianObservations on the Campaign Trail – Libertarians can be Environmentalists Too

The very first Libertarian event at which I spoke was at the Oregon State Convention in early March 2007. I spoke about the six areas of sustainability. Following my speech, a group of people formed around me, and through the crowd, a man approached. When he made his way to the front, I noticed that veins were pulsating in his forehead. He pointed right at me and said, “YOU SOUND LIKE A GREEN!”

I believe global warming is occurring. I know that this opinion is out of favor with some Libertarians. During the candidates’ forum at the Libertarian Party California Convention, held in April 2007, I was the only candidate (out of five) who publicly recognized that global warming exists. (Although to his defense, Steve Kubby did acknowledge that “something is going on with the environment.”)

However, far more Libertarians are concerned with Environmental Sustainability than those who are not. In fact, between 77 and 83% of Americans believe global warming poses a serious problem. The majority of Libertarians are no different. Certainly, there are some who question the data. If that is how you feel, so be it – we don’t harbor any hard feelings. We still live in a free country (that is, unless that Bush Administration gets its way).

Nevertheless, we find that most Libertarians embrace our principles. Regularly, I am approached at events, receive emails and phone calls from Libertarians who support our message. Even many “Purists” like our message as it reminds them of Harry Browns’ position on compromising to achieve political ends. These comments may not be from the more vocal segment of the party, but they are, nevertheless, the majority.

However – and I say this with the utmost respect and sincerity – I will not represent a party where the majority does not believe that global warming exists or who are not willing to compromise on this issue for the greater good.

Building the Libertarian and Green Parties Together

If we have any chance to even start addressing these issues, then we must destroy the 2-parties as quickly as possible. Viable solutions to solve these problems exist today. But, frightfully, these solutions will not be viable for much longer and these problems are growing in money and getting worse.

As a people, we must support only Independent and 3rd party candidates. We must band together during this next election and say: “Enough is enough!” We must elect an Independent Congress and an Independent President and we must do it in 2008! The two political parties that I support are the Libertarians and the Greens.

I am attracted to the Libertarians for its positions on personal accountability, small government, and maintaining and even bolstering freedom and democracy.

I am attracted to the Greens for its concern for the environment and our health and well-being.

The Libertarians and Greens are not in competition; rather, they complement each other in many areas.

Sharing Common Goals… What the 3rd parties have in Common

Each election brings forth Independent and 3rd party candidates. Many of these candidates promote their own agendas or those of their respective parties. The chart depicts our view on the areas of interest among the four major 3rd parties and Independent candidates.

As shown, the Libertarian Party generally addresses issues regarding the Economy, International Diplomacy, and Democracy & Freedom while the Green Party tends to focus more on Environmental, Health & Well-being, and Societal issues. The Reform Party, Working Families Party, and Independents vary in their focuses.

We admit this is a major simplification of the policy issues important to each party. Furthermore, we are not suggesting that Libertarians are not concerned with well-being or that the Green Party is not concerned with economic issues. The chart merely shows how the major 3rd parties relate to the six areas of Sustainability. (more…)

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You can read more details about Mr. Hollist’s ideas on his website.

Dave HollistTHANKS FOR LISTENING TO ME

I’ll try not to waste your time. Instead of being a candidate, I prefer to vote for someone–in fact–my wife and I have a ten-year-old who likes to play baseball and I much prefer running around with them than running for office. But unfortunately, I disagree with those on the ballot. I think it is wrong to take money from people.

There is a small group who thinks it’s all right to rob people: Criminals. And this is the reason government was invented–to hunt these people down and put them in jail. Surprisingly, there is another group who feels this same way: Non-Libertarian candidates. Now these people believe they’re special–if they do all the hard work to get elected, they feel they are entitled to do special things. And they even have a special name for what they do: Tax. Well, they’re not that special and what they do is just as wrong even though it’s been done for thousands of years. But we don’t put these people in jail–we just vote for someone better. So, I thought the only alternative was to be on the ballot myself.

Admittedly we do have an obvious problem since taxation is wrong: What’s right? The answer is CONTRACT INSURANCE–an idea that I learned several years ago. Let me give you an example: Bill Gates is the wealthiest person in the world. He is an American businessman who signs billion-dollar contracts. And if anything goes wrong–if people don’t follow through with what they had promised–his attorneys just present the contract to our government, and the courts adjudicate it. While most people respect these judgements, if necessary, the police are sent out and might have to shoot people if they become threatening in order to get what is due Mr. Gates.

This is a very valuable service that is provided by our government, but there is one thing that is wrong: It’s free. I don’t understand–how can something of such great value be free? Well, you guessed it. I propose that we charge people one percent of the value of their contracts to insure them against any breach. Now in this example, one percent would be ten million dollars that would be voluntarily paid into the United States Treasury, and this is just one man and this is just one of his contracts, so you can see that with all the contracts that are signed each day, this would raise hundreds of billions of dollars each year–more than enough money to effectively run our government.

Now it’s insurance–no one has to buy it, but if something goes wrong with his contracts and he didn’t have insurance, Mr. Gates would have a big problem. If he went out and forcibly tried to take what he felt he deserved, the police would stop him for attempting to take something he didn’t legally own. If he went to the government, he would be told that he should have bought insurance, and he probably would the next time. You can see the great incentive. (more…)

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While I couldn’t find anything written by Barry Hess about his Libertarian Presidential campaign (and in all honesty, I didn’t know he was running until I read it in one of Stephen Gordon’s articles here on LFV) I did find this autobiography, apparently written when he was running for a governorship.

Barry HessBarry Hess Biography

I graduated from Fordham University in New York City in 1978 and then spent a little time in Law School. It didn’t take too long for me to figure out that I really didn’t want to be a lawyer, I wanted to travel and see the world, and so I did.

I am sincerely grateful that a solid work ethic and the pursuit of excellence (not perfection) had been instilled in me by the examples I saw in my own family. I can’t say we were poor, because my family’s fortunes seemed to settle more to either extreme of being broke, or flush. I got to see both sides and the middle of the economic spectrum in detail. I know how the ‘other half’ lives.
I loved summers for as long as I can remember, its arrival meant that I could get out of Florida and go up North to Ohio to work
and play on my grandparent’s farm.

The first job I had that I actually got paid for, was when I was twelve years old. What started as a modest newspaper delivery route soon became the second-largest in the city of Springfield, Ohio. I just kept using my own earnings to buy out the other paper boys, and when we finally moved up to New Hampshire a couple of years later, I was able to sell my business for a handsome profit. I was hooked on self-reliance from that point on.

My Mom died after an extended and hard-fought bout with cancer. She was 48, I was a high school freshman of 14, and the loss exposed a profound realization of just how precious, fleeting and fragile our time here really is.

As I grew up I did the usual things like pumping gas, washing dishes and mowing lawns. One of the best jobs I had was as the host of my own radio program when I was a sophomore in high school. I had become entirely self-sufficient. If I couldn’t find a job I liked, I’d invent one. Pulling my own weight gave me dignity and self-respect. From my fourteenth birthday I felt the pangs of pride and from that time on I would refuse to accept even a single dime that I did not earn—from anyone.

In high school, I continued to involve myself in theatre and sports like skiing, track, football and baseball, as well as school politics where I served as class president and student representative. I didn’t graduate high school, in fact after 2 ½ years of it, I had had enough. I was bored, so I went to college at the University of New Hampshire, at Plymouth. My freshman year I was voted class president and played sports like soccer, skiing and lacrosse. My sophomore year through graduation was spent at Fordham University in the Bronx of New York City. In order to pay my own way, I scrubbed the school’s toilets, (calling myself “Commander Commodee”) and managed the campus center at night that gave me time to study. I started a travel business to provide low cost student vacations to Ft. Lauderdale for Spring Break.

In the summers, I worked interstate bridge construction as a laborer. For fun, it was the school’s theatre troupe, soccer, sky-diving and rugby that kept me busy.

After graduating in May of 1978 with a B.A. in English and indepth credits in History, Political Science and Philosophy, I moved into Manhattan and took a job as a legal hearing representative for fraud investigations for a major national insurance company. It wasn’t long before I was offered a promotion and a transfer to San Diego. My cross-country trek was interrupted with a visit to my sister, right here in Phoenix. I never made it to San Diego, it just felt ‘right’ to stay.

Today, I’m learning to invest as a currency speculator in the foreign exchange market.

Arizona is where I really grew up. I’ve tried a lot of things here, and a lot of different businesses, and I’ve made a lot of mistakes, just like people do. But you’ll not find an honest man who can say that I have ever cheated or stolen from them, even though I have managed to embarrass myself more times than I care to recount. (more…)

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